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Running R and RStudio Server on Red Hat Linux RHEL #rstats

Installing R

(OR sudo rpm -ivh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm )

THEN

  • sudo yum install R

THEN

  • sudo R

(and to paste in Linux Window- just use Shift + Insert)

To Install RStudio (from http://www.rstudio.com/ide/download/server)

32-bit

  •  sudo yum install --nogpgcheck rstudio-server-0.97.320-i686.rpm

OR 64-bit

  •  sudo yum install --nogpgcheck rstudio-server-0.97.320-x86_64.rpm

Then

  • sudo rstudio-server verify-installation

Changing Firewalls in your RHEL

-Change to Root

  • sudo bash 

-Change directory

  • cd etc/sysconfig

-Read Iptables ( or firewalls file)

  • vi iptables

( to quite vi , press escape, then colon :  then q )

-Change Iptables to open port 8787

  • /sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 8787 -j ACCEPT

Add new user name (here newuser1)

  • sudo useradd newuser1

Change password in new user name

  • sudo passwd newuser1

Now just login to IPADDRESS:8787 with user name and password above

(credit- IBM SmartCloud Support ,http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woVjq83gJkg&feature=player_embedded, Rstudio help, David Walker http://datamgmt.com/installing-r-and-rstudio-on-redhat-or-centos-linux/, www.google.com ,Michael Grieb)
 

 

Revolution Analytics and Pricing Analytics

Cost of 1 day of Revolution Analytics Training at http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/services/training/

 

1. Intro to R

Price:  Commercial: SGD$500.00
Academic:SGD$350.00

1 Singapore dollar = 0.8197 US dollars

10% Early Bird Discount Deadline: November 13, 2012 @ 12:00PM Pacific Time
Discount code: earlybird

2. (aptly titled Minimalistic Sufficient R…you think the ricing would be minimalistic.. but)

http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/services/training/public/minimalist-sufficient-r.php

Price: 

$750

$100 Early Bird Discount Deadline: November 16, 2012 @ 12:00PM Pacific Time
Discount code: earlybird

3.

Advanced R (Italian)

Price:  Commercial: €680.00
Academic: €480.00

1 euro = 1.2975 US dollars

4.

Big Data AnalyticS with RevoScaleR

Price:  $500 with 2 month Revolution R Enterprise workstation evaluation.

$700 with 1 year subscription of Revolution R enterprise workstation ($1500 value)

10% Early Bird Discount Deadline: October 30, 2012 @ 12:00PM Pacific Time
Discount code: early

5.

Revolution R Time Series Training

Price:  Commercial: S$1,200.00
Academic:S$750.00

10% Early Bird Discount Deadline: October 30, 2012 @ 12:00PM Pacific Time
Discount code: earlybird

so training costs differently different strokes for different folks I guess,

BUT me hearties.

Cost of 1 year of Revolution Enterprise= $1000

Thats a flat rate, so the Linux and Windows costs the same and so does the 32-bit and 64-bit

(see http://buy.revolutionanalytics.com/ )

( My comment- either Revo should give away the license for free to enterprises, rationalize training costs, seriously how can 2 days of training cost like a 1 year of license and the software is definitely quite good., or create a paid Amazon Ec 2 AMI for enterprises to rent the Revolution Analytics software (like SAP Hana ), or even on Windows Azure if they insist on hugging Microsoft, though I am clearly seeing various flavors of Linux beating Windows Server to a pulp in the Big Data market, though I am probably more optimistic on the Windows 8 on Surface but because of hardware not software/ Azure alternative to Amazon given Google’s delayed offering- I dont even know many many instance of Windows related HPC or HPA,  (/end_of_rant)

Annual Subscription
Includes software license and technical support
Price Quantity Total
Revolution R Enterprise Single-User Workstation (64-bit Windows) $1,000.00 $0.00
Revolution R Enterprise Single-User Workstation (32-bit Windows) $1,000.00 $0.00
Revolution R Enterprise Single-User Workstation (64-bit Red Hat 6 Enterprise Linux) $1,000.00 $0.00
Revolution R Enterprise Single-User Workstation (64-bit Red Hat 5 Enterprise Linux) $1,000.00 $0.00

 

Revolution R Enterprise 6.0 launched!

Just got the email-more software is good news!

Revolution R Enterprise 6.0 for 32-bit and 64-bit Windows and 64-bit Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL 5.x and RHEL 6.x) features an updated release of the RevoScaleR package that provides fast, scalable data management and data analysis: the same code scales from data frames to local, high-performance .xdf files to data distributed across a Windows HPC Server cluster or IBM Platform Computing LSF cluster.  RevoScaleR also allows distribution of the execution of essentially any R function across cores and nodes, delivering the results back to the user.

Detailed information on what’s new in 6.0 and known issues:
http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/doc/README_RevoEnt_Windows_6.0.0.pdf

and from the manual-lots of function goodies for Big Data

 

  • IBM Platform LSF Cluster support [Linux only]. The new RevoScaleR function, RxLsfCluster, allows you to create a distributed compute context for the Platform LSF workload manager.
  •  Azure Burst support added for Microsoft HPC Server [Windows only]. The new RevoScaleR function, RxAzureBurst, allows you to create a distributed compute context to have computations performed in the cloud using Azure Burst
  • The rxExec function allows distributed execution of essentially any R function across cores and nodes, delivering the results back to the user.
  • functions RxLocalParallel and RxLocalSeq allow you to create compute context objects for local parallel and local sequential computation, respectively.
  • RxForeachDoPar allows you to create a compute context using the currently registered foreach parallel backend (doParallel, doSNOW, doMC, etc.). To execute rxExec calls, simply register the parallel backend as usual, then set your compute context as follows: rxSetComputeContext(RxForeachDoPar())
  • rxSetComputeContext and rxGetComputeContext simplify management of compute contexts.
  • rxGlm, provides a fast, scalable, distributable implementation of generalized linear models. This expands the list of full-featured high performance analytics functions already available: summary statistics (rxSummary), cubes and cross tabs (rxCube,rxCrossTabs), linear models (rxLinMod), covariance and correlation matrices (rxCovCor),
    binomial logistic regression (rxLogit), and k-means clustering (rxKmeans)example: a Tweedie family with 1 million observations and 78 estimated coefficients (categorical data)
    took 17 seconds with rxGlm compared with 377 seconds for glm on a quadcore laptop

     

    and easier working with R’s big brother SAS language

     

    RevoScaleR high-performance analysis functions will now conveniently work directly with a variety of external data sources (delimited and fixed format text files, SAS files, SPSS files, and ODBC data connections). New functions are provided to create data source objects to represent these data sources (RxTextData, RxOdbcData, RxSasData, and RxSpssData), which in turn can be specified for the ‘data’ argument for these RevoScaleR analysis functions: rxHistogramrxSummary, rxCube, rxCrossTabs, rxLinMod, rxCovCor, rxLogit, and rxGlm.


    example, 

    you can analyze a SAS file directly as follows:


    # Create a SAS data source with information about variables and # rows to read in each chunk

    sasDataFile <- file.path(rxGetOption(“sampleDataDir”),”claims.sas7bdat”)
    sasDS <- RxSasData(sasDataFile, stringsAsFactors = TRUE,colClasses = c(RowNum = “integer”),rowsPerRead = 50)

    # Compute and draw a histogram directly from the SAS file
    rxHistogram( ~cost|type, data = sasDS)
    # Compute summary statistics
    rxSummary(~., data = sasDS)
    # Estimate a linear model
    linModObj <- rxLinMod(cost~age + car_age + type, data = sasDS)
    summary(linModObj)
    # Import a subset into a data frame for further inspection
    subData <- rxImport(inData = sasDS, rowSelection = cost > 400,
    varsToKeep = c(“cost”, “age”, “type”))
    subData

 

The installation instructions and instructions for getting started with Revolution R Enterprise & RevoDeployR for Windows: http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/downloads/instructions/windows.php

Oracle adds R to Big Data Appliance -Use #Rstats

From the press release, Oracle gets on R and me too- NoSQL

http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/press/512001

The Oracle Big Data Appliance is a new engineered system that includes an open source distribution of Apache™ Hadoop™, Oracle NoSQL Database, Oracle Data Integrator Application Adapter for Hadoop, Oracle Loader for Hadoop, and an open source distribution of R.

From

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/10/03/oracle_big_data_appliance/

the Big Data Appliance also includes the R programming language, a popular open source statistical-analysis tool. This R engine will integrate with 11g R2, so presumably if you want to do statistical analysis on unstructured data stored in and chewed by Hadoop, you will have to move it to Oracle after the chewing has subsided.

This approach to R-Hadoop integration is different from that announced last week between Revolution Analytics, the so-called Red Hat for stats that is extending and commercializing the R language and its engine, and Cloudera, which sells a commercial Hadoop setup called CDH3 and which was one of the early companies to offer support for Hadoop. Both Revolution Analytics and Cloudera now have Oracle as their competitor, which was no doubt no surprise to either.

In any event, the way they do it, the R engine is put on each node in the Hadoop cluster, and those R engines just see the Hadoop data as a native format that they can do analysis on individually. As statisticians do analyses on data sets, the summary data from all the nodes in the Hadoop cluster is sent back to their R workstations; they have no idea that they are using MapReduce on unstructured data.

Oracle did not supply configuration and pricing information for the Big Data Appliance, and also did not say when it would be for sale or shipping to customers

From

http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/features/feature-oracle-nosql-database-505146.html

A Horizontally Scaled, Key-Value Database for the Enterprise
Oracle NoSQL Database is a commercial grade, general-purpose NoSQL database using a key/value paradigm. It allows you to manage massive quantities of data, cope with changing data formats, and submit simple queries. Complex queries are supported using Hadoop or Oracle Database operating upon Oracle NoSQL Database data.

Oracle NoSQL Database delivers scalable throughput with bounded latency, easy administration, and a simple programming model. It scales horizontally to hundreds of nodes with high availability and transparent load balancing. Customers might choose Oracle NoSQL Database to support Web applications, acquire sensor data, scale authentication services, or support online serves and social media.

and

from

http://siliconangle.com/blog/2011/09/30/oracle-adopting-open-source-r-to-connect-legacy-systems/

Oracle says it will integrate R with its Oracle Database. Other signs from Oracle show the deeper interest in using the statistical framework for integration with Hadoop to potentially speed statistical analysis. This has particular value with analyzing vast amounts of unstructured data, which has overwhelmed organizations, especially over the past year.

and

from

http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/features/features-oracle-r-enterprise-498732.html

Oracle R Enterprise

Integrates the Open-Source Statistical Environment R with Oracle Database 11g
Oracle R Enterprise allows analysts and statisticians to run existing R applications and use the R client directly against data stored in Oracle Database 11g—vastly increasing scalability, performance and security. The combination of Oracle Database 11g and R delivers an enterprise-ready, deeply integrated environment for advanced analytics. Users can also use analytical sandboxes, where they can analyze data and develop R scripts for deployment while results stay managed inside Oracle Database.

Amazon Ec2 goes Red Hat

message from Amazing Amazon’s cloud team- this will also help for #rstats users given that revolution Analytics full versions on RHEL.

—————————————————-

on-demand instances of Amazon EC2 running Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for as little as $0.145 per instance hour. The offering combines the cost-effectiveness, scalability and flexibility of running in Amazon EC2 with the proven reliability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Highlights of the offering include:

  • Support is included through subscription to AWS Premium Support with back-line support by Red Hat
  • Ongoing maintenance, including security patches and bug fixes, via update repositories available in all Amazon EC2 regions
  • Amazon EC2 running RHEL currently supports RHEL 5.5, RHEL 5.6, RHEL 6.0 and RHEL 6.1 in both 32 bit and 64 bit formats, and is available in all Regions.
  • Customers who already own Red Hat licenses will continue to be able to use those licenses at no additional charge.
  • Like all services offered by AWS, Amazon EC2 running Red Hat Enterprise Linux offers a low-cost, pay-as-you-go model with no long-term commitments and no minimum fees.

For more information, please visit the Amazon EC2 Red Hat Enterprise Linux page.

which is

Amazon EC2 Running Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Amazon EC2 running Red Hat Enterprise Linux provides a dependable platform to deploy a broad range of applications. By running RHEL on EC2, you can leverage the cost effectiveness, scalability and flexibility of Amazon EC2, the proven reliability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and AWS premium support with back-line support from Red Hat.. Red Hat Enterprise Linux on EC2 is available in versions 5.5, 5.6, 6.0, and 6.1, both in 32-bit and 64-bit architectures.

Amazon EC2 running Red Hat Enterprise Linux provides seamless integration with existing Amazon EC2 features including Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon CloudWatch, Elastic-Load Balancing, and Elastic IPs. Red Hat Enterprise Linux instances are available in multiple Availability Zones in all Regions.

Sign Up

Pricing

Pay only for what you use with no long-term commitments and no minimum fee.

On-Demand Instances

On-Demand Instances let you pay for compute capacity by the hour with no long-term commitments.

Region:US – N. VirginiaUS – N. CaliforniaEU – IrelandAPAC – SingaporeAPAC – Tokyo
Standard Instances Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Small (Default) $0.145 per hour
Large $0.40 per hour
Extra Large $0.74 per hour
Micro Instances Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Micro $0.08 per hour
High-Memory Instances Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Extra Large $0.56 per hour
Double Extra Large $1.06 per hour
Quadruple Extra Large $2.10 per hour
High-CPU Instances Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Medium $0.23 per hour
Extra Large $0.78 per hour
Cluster Compute Instances Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Quadruple Extra Large $1.70 per hour
Cluster GPU Instances Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Quadruple Extra Large $2.20 per hour

Pricing is per instance-hour consumed for each instance type. Partial instance-hours consumed are billed as full hours.

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and

Available Instance Types

Standard Instances

Instances of this family are well suited for most applications.

Small Instance – default*

1.7 GB memory
1 EC2 Compute Unit (1 virtual core with 1 EC2 Compute Unit)
160 GB instance storage
32-bit platform
I/O Performance: Moderate
API name: m1.small

Large Instance

7.5 GB memory
4 EC2 Compute Units (2 virtual cores with 2 EC2 Compute Units each)
850 GB instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m1.large

Extra Large Instance

15 GB memory
8 EC2 Compute Units (4 virtual cores with 2 EC2 Compute Units each)
1,690 GB instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m1.xlarge

Micro Instances

Instances of this family provide a small amount of consistent CPU resources and allow you to burst CPU capacity when additional cycles are available. They are well suited for lower throughput applications and web sites that consume significant compute cycles periodically.

Micro Instance

613 MB memory
Up to 2 EC2 Compute Units (for short periodic bursts)
EBS storage only
32-bit or 64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Low
API name: t1.micro

High-Memory Instances

Instances of this family offer large memory sizes for high throughput applications, including database and memory caching applications.

High-Memory Extra Large Instance

17.1 GB of memory
6.5 EC2 Compute Units (2 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each)
420 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Moderate
API name: m2.xlarge

High-Memory Double Extra Large Instance

34.2 GB of memory
13 EC2 Compute Units (4 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each)
850 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m2.2xlarge

High-Memory Quadruple Extra Large Instance

68.4 GB of memory
26 EC2 Compute Units (8 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each)
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: m2.4xlarge

High-CPU Instances

Instances of this family have proportionally more CPU resources than memory (RAM) and are well suited for compute-intensive applications.

High-CPU Medium Instance

1.7 GB of memory
5 EC2 Compute Units (2 virtual cores with 2.5 EC2 Compute Units each)
350 GB of instance storage
32-bit platform
I/O Performance: Moderate
API name: c1.medium

High-CPU Extra Large Instance

7 GB of memory
20 EC2 Compute Units (8 virtual cores with 2.5 EC2 Compute Units each)
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: High
API name: c1.xlarge

Cluster Compute Instances

Instances of this family provide proportionally high CPU resources with increased network performance and are well suited for High Performance Compute (HPC) applications and other demanding network-bound applications. Learn more about use of this instance type for HPC applications.

Cluster Compute Quadruple Extra Large Instance

23 GB of memory
33.5 EC2 Compute Units (2 x Intel Xeon X5570, quad-core “Nehalem” architecture)
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Very High (10 Gigabit Ethernet)
API name: cc1.4xlarge

Cluster GPU Instances

Instances of this family provide general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs) with proportionally high CPU and increased network performance for applications benefitting from highly parallelized processing, including HPC, rendering and media processing applications. While Cluster Compute Instances provide the ability to create clusters of instances connected by a low latency, high throughput network, Cluster GPU Instances provide an additional option for applications that can benefit from the efficiency gains of the parallel computing power of GPUs over what can be achieved with traditional processors. Learn more about use of this instance type for HPC applications.

Cluster GPU Quadruple Extra Large Instance

22 GB of memory
33.5 EC2 Compute Units (2 x Intel Xeon X5570, quad-core “Nehalem” architecture)
2 x NVIDIA Tesla “Fermi” M2050 GPUs
1690 GB of instance storage
64-bit platform
I/O Performance: Very High (10 Gigabit Ethernet)
API name: cg1.4xlarge

 


Getting Started

To get started using Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Amazon EC2, perform the following steps:

  • Open and log into the AWS Management Console
  • Click on Launch Instance from the EC2 Dashboard
  • Select the Red Hat Enterprise Linux AMI from the QuickStart tab
  • Specify additional details of your instance and click Launch
  • Additional details can be found on each AMI’s Catalog Entry page

The AWS Management Console is an easy tool to start and manage your instances. If you are looking for more details on launching an instance, a quick video tutorial on how to use Amazon EC2 with the AWS Management Console can be found here .
A full list of Red Hat Enterprise Linux AMIs can be found in the AWS AMI Catalog.

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Support

All customers running Red Hat Enterprise Linux on EC2 will receive access to repository updates from Red Hat. Moreover, AWS Premium support customers can contact AWS to get access to a support structure from both Amazon and Red Hat.

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Resources

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About Red Hat

Red Hat, the world’s leading open source solutions provider, is headquartered in Raleigh, NC with over 50 satellite offices spanning the globe. Red Hat provides high-quality, low-cost technology with its operating system platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, together with applications, management and Services Oriented Architecture (SOA) solutions, including the JBoss Enterprise Middleware Suite. Red Hat also offers support, training and consulting services to its customers worldwide.

 

also from Revolution Analytics- in case you want to #rstats in the cloud and thus kill all that talk of RAM dependency, slow R than other softwares (just increase the RAM above in the instances to keep it simple)

,or Revolution not being open enough

http://www.revolutionanalytics.com/downloads/gpl-sources.php

GPL SOURCES

Revolution Analytics uses an Open-Core Licensing model. We provide open- source R bundled with proprietary modules from Revolution Analytics that provide additional functionality for our users. Open-source R is distributed under the GNU Public License (version 2), and we make our software available under a commercial license.

Revolution Analytics respects the importance of open source licenses and has contributed code to the open source R project and will continue to do so. We have carefully reviewed our compliance with GPLv2 and have worked with Mark Radcliffe of DLA Piper, the outside General Legal Counsel of the Open Source Initiative, to ensure that we fully comply with the obligations of the GPLv2.

For our Revolution R distribution, we may make some minor modifications to the R sources (the ChangeLog file lists all changes made). You can download these modified sources of open-source R under the terms of the GPLv2, using either the links below or those in the email sent to you when you download a specific version of Revolution R.

Download GPL Sources

Product Version Platform Modified R Sources
Revolution R Community 3.2 Windows R 2.10.1
Revolution R Community 3.2 MacOS R 2.10.1
Revolution R Enterprise 3.1.1 RHEL R 2.9.2
Revolution R Enterprise 4.0 Windows R 2.11.1
Revolution R Enterprise 4.0.1 RHEL R 2.11.1
Revolution R Enterprise 4.1.0 Windows R 2.11.1
Revolution R Enterprise 4.2 Windows R 2.11.1
Revolution R Enterprise 4.2 RHEL R 2.11.1
Revolution R Enterprise 4.3 Windows & RHEL R 2.12.2

 

 

 

Free and Open Source cannot get basic economics correct

Nutch robots

Image via Wikipedia

Before you rev up those keyboards, and shoot off a snarky comment- consider this statement- there are many ways to run (and ruin economies). But they still have not found a replacement for money. Yes Happiness is important. Search Engine is good.

So unless they start a new branch of economics with lots more motivational theory and psychology and lot less quant especially for open source projects, money ,revenue, sales is the only true measure of success in enterprise software. Particularly if you have competitors who are making more money selling the same class of software.

Popularity contests are for high school quarterbacks —so even if your open source software is popular in downloads, email discussions, stack overflow or (more…)

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